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Phil Falco just completed his 20th year working in the field of strength and conditioning in professional baseball. A native of Denville, NJ, Phil Graduated from Morris Knolls HS in Morris County, NJ where he earned three letters in football and baseball. After HS, he enrolled at George Mason University in Fairfax, VA where he helped pitch GMU to regional appearances in 1993 and 1994. In 1995, he transferred to Appalachian State University in Boone, NC and helped pitch the Mountaineers to two more regional appearances in 1995 and 1996. Phil graduated from Appalachian State in 1996 with a BS degree in Exercise Science.

After graduation, he had a brief career pitching for the Independent League Richmond Roosters in Richmond, IN. His career in professional baseball began in 1997 as a strength and conditioning intern for the Tampa Bay Class A affiliate in Charleston, SC. Phil was the roving minor league strength and conditioning instructor for the Atlanta Braves from 1998-1999. The Brewers named him their Head MLB Strength and Conditioning Coach in 2000, a position he held through 2002. He returned to Atlanta in 2003 where he was the minor league rover from 2002-2007 and was Head MLB Strength and Conditioning Coach from 2008-2016. In 2017, he joined the KC Royals as a minor league Strength and Conditioning Coach for their AAA PCL affiliate, the Omaha Strom Chasers. Phil also worked with a in winter ball team in Venezuela in 2017.

Phil is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and Registered Strength and Conditioning Coach (RSCC) through the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). He is also FMS Level 1, First-Aid and CPR certified.

He is single and resides in Atlanta, GA during the off-season. Phil enjoys working with athletes of all age groups to help them realize their athletic and personal health goals. He is also an avid football fan with a passion for the New York Giants.

His goal when working with players is to design and implement personalized, baseball-specific conditioning programs to 1) increase player knowledge of the basic principles of strength and conditioning as they apply to performance and personal health; 2) help reduce the risk of injury; and 3) help athletes achieve their genetic potential.

 

 

 

 

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